Edward Snowden’s talk on internet privacy

Almost everyone these days will have their own stand and view on government surveillance, one such person being Edward Snowden. In a recent remote interview (being part of the New Yorker Festival) he pushed the idea that people who care about their privacy should stay away from popular consumer Internet services like: Dropbox, Facebook, and Google.

The discussion had some people talking about their view that they ‘don’t have anything to hide’ of which then Edward Snowden went on to say:

When you say, ‘I have nothing to hide,’ you’re saying, ‘I don’t care about this right.’ You’re saying, ‘I don’t have this right, because I’ve got to the point where I have to justify it.’ The way rights work is, the government has to justify its intrusion into your rights.

Edward snowden then went on to say:

We can have secret programs. You know, the American people don’t have to know the name of every individual that’s under investigation. We don’t need to know the technical details of absolutely every program in the intelligence community. But we do have to know the bare and broad outlines of the powers our government is claiming … and how they affect us and how they affect our relationships overseas. Because if we don’t, we are no longer citizens, we no longer have leaders. We’re subjects, and we have rulers.

“We’re talking about encryption. We’re talking about dropping programs that are hostile to privacy. For example, Dropbox? Get rid of Dropbox, it doesn’t support encryption, it doesn’t protect your private files. And use competitors like SpiderOak, that do the same exact service but they protect the content of what you’re sharing.”

After a bit of reasearch on this topic some journalists did a bit of digging on DropBox’s blog and found this statement that directly contradicts Snowden’s last statement.

All files sent and retrieved from Dropbox are encrypted while traveling between you and our servers,

…Below is the full Edward Snowden interview and no matter what side you sit on its definitely worth a watch.

Original news source: TechCrunch.com
Image Source: Pixbay.com

James Stevenson

Im a Cyber Security enthusiast that loves all things to do with technology. I'm specifically interested in cyber security and ethical hacking.

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  • Neo Corricon

    Digging? Perhaps consult and industry expert in the future? Dropbox does not encrypt data at rest, SpiderOak does. This is a monumental difference and Edward’s point is valid. Almost every website, even Facebook uses HTTPS to encrypt data sent between the browser and the web server.

  • Neo Corricon

    Once again homework…
    Dropbox uses a key they control. Any IT worker at Dropbox can read your data.
    SpiderOak, and a host of other services, allow you to use a key only you control making it impossible for them to read your data.